Florence tourist guide

Florence Landmarks

Consult GoFlorence.it it to find out the best landmarks in Florence. The city is considered the birthplace of the Renaissance in Italy and the exceptional artistic heritage makes Florence famous all over the world thanks to the work of famous artists such as Donatello, Raffaello, Michelangelo and Leonardo da Vinci.
The best time to visit the many tourist attractions in Florence is between March and June or September to October when the climate is warm and the days quite long and perfect for your travel.
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Piazza del Duomo

Piazza del Duomo

Piazza del Duomo and Piazza San Giovanni stand in a rectangular area forming two separate but communicating squares. In Piazza del Duomo is located the famous basilica of Santa Maria del Fiore that is considered the third biggest cathedral in the world. Piazza del Duomo is one of the busiest areas of the city and is the starting point in order to visit the other tourist attractions and works of art.


Piazza San Giovanni

Piazza San Giovanni

In piazza San Giovanni is located the ancient Baptistery, one of the oldest architectural monuments in Florence. The exterior has three-arched façade punctuated by windows and series of arches. The Baptistery is thought to have been a pagan temple dedicated to Mars and its origins are dated in the fourth century.


Duomo Cathedral

Duomo Cathedral

The Duomo is the city’s most glorious landmark and the tallest building in Florence. This stunning Gothic cathedral was completed in 1463. Inside the Duomo you can admire the famous "Last Judgment" that was painted by Vasari and Zuccari. It is still considered the largest brick dome in the world. Climbing the dome stairs you can enjoy the amazing view of the Giotto tower.


Giotto Tower

Giotto Tower

Considered the finest example of Italian Gothic architecture, Giotto Tower was built in 1334 by Giotto and completed in 1359 by Francesco Talenti. You can climb the staircase and admire the spectacular view from the 85 meter tall campanile. It was built in a way that the bells could be heard far and wide, to announce mass, celebrations or imminent danger.


Ponte Vecchio

Ponte Vecchio (Old Bridge)

The Ponte Vecchio was built in 1345 on the Arno River and is Florence’s oldest bridge.
It’s the only bridge survived the Nazi bombing during the World War II and has a secret passageway, the Corridoio Vasariano, that links the Uffizi Gallery with Pitti Palace. The corridoio, reopened to the public in 1997, was built to protect the powerful Medici family.
The bridge is lined with gold and silversmith shops and is a prime shopping stop for tourists.


Pitti Palace

Pitti Palace

Pitti Palace was built in 1440 for the Pitti family as a challenge to the omnipotent Medici.
Ironically the building ends up in Medici hands when the wife of Cosimo I bought it with the park and square in front of it in 1550.
Cosimo called his architect, Giorgio Vasari, to raise a passageway, the Corridoio Vasariano, making the Palace reachable without having to see the crowds. Now the palace houses six different museums.


Piazza della Signoria

Piazza della Signoria

Considered for centuries the heart of Florence, Piazza Signoria is one of the major attractions in Florence. It’s embedded with magnificent old buildings and beautiful sculptures such as the equestre monument of Cosimo I or the Fontana of Neptune erected during the construction of a new aqueduct.
You can reach the square by foot in 10 minutes from Santa Maria Novella railway station.


Palazzo Vecchio

Palazzo Vecchio (Old Palace)

Located in Piazza della Signoria, the Old Palace, was built for the Medici family and completed in 1322. This fortified palace has a tall bell tower constructed to notify people of city’s events. Inside there is a museum with works of art from several European drawers from the 15th to the 18th century.


Fortezza da Basso

Fortezza da Basso

Designed by Antonio da Sangallo, Fortezza da Basso is considered a building of great value for the military architecture. The architect erected the fortress in a pentagon style almost half a century ago.
Over the years it lost the originally function symbolizing the end of the attacks to the city and being used as prison or arsenal. Now Fortezza da Basso hosts many events such as the jewellery market show and the Pitti fashion show.


Casa Buonarroti

Casa Buonarroti

Buonarroti House was constructed by the great-grandson of Michelangelo Buonarroti. Now the building hosts a wonderful collection of art with 22 rooms open to the public.
Between the many sculptures, frescos and bronzes are conserved also the “Battaglia Dei Centauri”, the beautiful “Madonna della Scala” and “Crocifisso Ligneo of S. Spirito”.


Santa Croce Church

Santa Croce Church

Located in the east of Florence, Santa Croce Church was built in the 13th century. It was designed by Arnolfo di Cambio, architect of the Duomo and it’s famous for the beautiful frescos and for the tombs of Italy’s most gifted man such as Michelangelo, Machiavelli, Galileo, Rossini and many others.
In the cloister, outside the church, was erected the Pazzi chapel, one of the masterpiece of the Renaissance, designed by Brunelleschi in 1430.


Santa Maria Novella

Santa Maria Novella

Santa Maria Novella is one of the most important churches of Florence. Built in 1246, it was erected on the site of the ancient Santa Maria delle Vigne oratory and completed in 1360.


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